mikejh.

mostlymarilynmonroe:


      That day on the set I bumped into a graphic example of how insecure Marilyn is. One scene calls for her, as a chorus girl, to sit off to one side doing homework for the courses she is taking in night school. She makes notations in a composition book in this scene. After it was shot to Cukor’s satisfaction, Marilyn headed for her dressing room and left the notebook where she had been sitting.    One of the men in the cast happened to glance at the notes she had been making. They were all addressed to herself:What am I afraid of?Why am I so afraid?Do I think I can’t act?I know I can act, but I am afraid.I am afraid and I should not be and I must not be.     There followed, the actor later told me, the word which, when uttered publicly, entitles its utterer to become a member of the club recently founded by Eva Marie Saint.    The actor was too much of a gentleman to read further. “It made her seem even more naked than she did on those calendars she once posed for.”

-“The Big M” by Richard Gehman in The American Weekly- May 1, 1960

mostlymarilynmonroe:

      That day on the set I bumped into a graphic example of how insecure Marilyn is. One scene calls for her, as a chorus girl, to sit off to one side doing homework for the courses she is taking in night school. She makes notations in a composition book in this scene. After it was shot to Cukor’s satisfaction, Marilyn headed for her dressing room and left the notebook where she had been sitting.
    One of the men in the cast happened to glance at the notes she had been making. They were all addressed to herself:

What am I afraid of?
Why am I so afraid?
Do I think I can’t act?
I know I can act, but I am afraid.
I am afraid and I should not be
and I must not be.

     There followed, the actor later told me, the word which, when uttered publicly, entitles its utterer to become a member of the club recently founded by Eva Marie Saint.
    The actor was too much of a gentleman to read further. “It made her seem even more naked than she did on those calendars she once posed for.”

-“The Big M” by Richard Gehman in The American Weekly- May 1, 1960

(via davidfincher)

kaajoo:

World’s Most Beautiful Abandoned Places

Italian product manager and web designer Francesco Mugnai recently added a collection of images to his blog touting some of the most beautiful images of abandoned spots and modern ruins that he’d ever seen. The images Mugnai has captured come from empty castles, shuttered power plants, and dilapidated churches around the world. From a sunken yacht in Antarctica to a forever-closed amusement park in Japan, these images all make up a sort of anti-phoenix; rather than rising as new from the ashes, these husks remain preserved in decomposition, forcing viewers to confront the strange beauty of ruination.

(via into-my-arms)

Look at that lamp across the room. Now look back at me. Look back at the lamp. Now look back at me again. Do you see what you did? You blinked. Those are cuts. After the first look, you know that there’s no need to pan continuously from me to the lamp because you know what’s in between. Your mind cut the scene. First you behold the lamp. Cut. Then you behold me.

—John Huston (via dwayneomosley)

talkingwithtim:

Worst piggyback ride ever: John Huston & Orson Welles

talkingwithtim:

Worst piggyback ride ever: John Huston & Orson Welles

seeya marzipan. may you slink through heaven’s repertory theatre forever. 

seeya marzipan. may you slink through heaven’s repertory theatre forever. 

I was raped by four men in one evening. I got drunk and tried to say no. What did my predators do? They told me to drink more. They shoved a bottle in my face and told me to keep drinking. Drink till I was drunk enough to fuck them. I blacked out. They urinated on me. They assaulted me. They shoved foreign objects in my body, anally and vaginally. They took videos. I was just 16 years old. The video was sent around my entire school, and I was bullied every single day of my senior year of high school. I lost all of my friends. I was physically and verbally abused by peers and people I once called friends. Someone tried to set me on fire in the hallway during passing period. Nobody sympathized with me. Nobody cared about the fact that because of these events, I was trying to kill myself every single day. I was cutting myself, making myself puke, showering upwards of fifteen times a day because I felt filthy. I was scratching and peeling the skin off of my body because I was dirty. I looked at myself like I deserved what I got. The world saw me as dirty, so I began to see myself that way, too. My rapists were praised by my peers for their deed. I never had a voice. When I first learned about the Steubenville incident going to trial, I was overjoyed. Because Jane Doe’s story was my story, and if anyone deserved justice, it was her. She would get the justice I never got. She would change the tide of the rape culture movement. Despite the horrific events that occurred, I knew that the justice served would help ease her pain. But she didn’t get justice, and now she has to witness this news coverage, favoring and sympathizing with her attackers. Pain is not an accurate word to describe what she is feeling right now. Pain is the simplest term you could use. As a rape victim and an aspiring journalist, I am disgusted with the way this case was reported on. Jane Doe’s rapists deserve their suffering in prison. They deserve more. They do not deserve to be sympathized with. They made their stupid decision, and they deserve whatever consequences come their way. If you don’t want to be labeled as a rapist, don’t fucking rape.

—Anonymous comment left on the CNN petition demanding they apologize for sympathizing with the Steubenville rapists (via theworldmaybebroken)

(Source: , via franki-e)

I struggle with the idea of winning awards for acting. Stating I’m Best Actor for something as subjective as film seems strange to me. To the uninitiated it implies I’m solely responsible for the creation and implementation of the character. I am not. I suppose that’s why we thank our colleagues. There are those who you all know such as Paul Thomas Anderson, to whom I am eternally grateful – a man who has persistently searched for the truth. I am fortunate to have been under his guidance. Philip Seymour Hoffman for his patience and advice. Amy Adams for being angry. Megan Ellison and everyone at Annapurna for their support of the film and ensuring that I was able to cover my mortgage. But there are many others who you do not know by name such as Mike Kenna, who I believe was the grip but he did 20 different jobs so I can’t be sure; Adam Somner, the first assistant director; Karen Ramirez in the office; Tommy – I don’t know your last name… there are too many to list. The truth is, you cannot separate my work from their’s. We were a unit bolstered by the same goal: to do our part in helping Paul to achieve his vision. I view this award as recognition of all of our work. I am very cognisant of the fact that for me this award is an encouragement to continue my lifelong passion of being an actor. I will not squander this high regard. P.S. There’s an up-and-coming actor named Daniel who’s in a movie called ‘Lincoln.’ You should check it out.

—Accepting the “Best Actor” award at the London Critics Circle Awards, Joaquin Phoenix gives one of the best acceptance speeches I’ve ever heard (er, read). (via misterfilms)

(via larsulric-h)